Losmandy Astronomical Products Debuts New G-Series Interchangeable RA and Dec Assemblies

Image 1: Losmandy GM811G.

Losmandy’s venerable GM8, GM11 and HGM Titan mounts are such mainstays of amateur astronomy, you’d think they would defy fundamental innovation. Nevertheless, the mounts were recently treated to precisely that – indeed, to an enhancement that is so fundamental as to be game-changing.

So, what’s the big change? Simply that the Losmandy G8, Gll and HGM Titan RA and Dec assemblies are now independent components, allowing you to match, for example, a GM8 Dec assembly to a GM11 RA assembly, or a GM11 Dec assembly to a Titan RA assembly, to create mounts with payload capacities that fill the gaps between those of the three longstanding GM8, GM11 and HGM Titan increments. And why would you want to do that? Because it’s more cost-effective to invest in components that target those in-between payload capacities than to make the full jump.

And there’s another advantage: You can get more versatility out of the Losmandy components in which you’ve already invested. Assume, for example, you already own a GM8 with a payload capacity of 30 pounds that you bought for imaging in the field with a fast, lightweight refractor. Because its complete equatorial head weighs just 21 easy-to-transport pounds, the

Image 2: Losmandy G11GT.

standard GM8 is wonderfully portable. But now you need a mount with a payload capacity of 30 to 50 pounds to carry an SCT you want to install in that new observatory you’re planning. Heretofore, you’d have to make the full step up to a complete G11, with a payload capacity of 60 pounds, despite that it may be overkill for the application.

Now, you need only invest in a G11 RA assembly, to which you’ll attached your existing GM8’s Dec assembly. You’ll save money by more specifically targeting the payload capacity you need in your observatory, while retaining the more portable full GM8 configuration.

So, is your vintage GM8, GM11 or HGM Titan compatible with this new system? Yes, every mount component Losmandy makes is and will always be retrofittable … from day one. The appropriate extension or adapter that facilitates this new interchangeable system can be added to any classic Losmandy mount.

To clarify, there are now five base Losmandy mount configurations: the GM8, the GM811G, the G11, the G11GT and the HGM Titan, and you can upgrade your standard GM8, G11or HGM Titan to make it configurable with other Losmandy Dec and RA assemblies.

Another welcome change to all Losmandy mount configurations is that the company is including the high-torque motor option as standard, and the motors are now tucked in for a more compact overall profile. The motor assemblies are less vulnerable in this new configuration, and the resulting esthetic is more pleasing, too.

Losmandy is also working on new worm-system gearing for all mounts, but more on that planned innovation as soon as details become available. Best yet, Losmandy has not changed the base prices of its mounts, despite these significant upgrades.

For more information, visit http://www.losmandy.com or click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfFvn9KTSgU for an excellent video discussing the new Losmandy mount system.

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